Review – Batman: Gotham City Chronicles

mr. riddles, the jokerman, batman's carmobile
It's time for the second review of Chronicles month, and oh boy, have we got a chronicle for you.

With a price point of $130, Batman: Gotham City Chronicles is the second most expensive game we've ever reviewed. If there's a bat-thing you love, you're bound to find it sequestered in one (one!) of this game's many, many boxes.

But could some boxes of fictitious bats ever be worth that much money? Click play, let us tell you what we think.


Review: Underwater Cities

Pimp my Symbiotic City Dome, vanilla churn, a goodie fountain
Kylie: In Vladimír Suchý's heavy management game Underwater Cities, players are competing to build the ultimate deep sea nation. But is it actually better, down where it’s wetter? Are there no troubles when life is the bubbles? Can we really trust a crustacean that sings? I guess we should find out.

Each player is given a personal city map which you'll fill with a scattering of white and red biodomes, which will connect to a flourishing network of factories and laboratories. Ideally, this network will score you points, as well as act as an engine that'll occasionally spew out resources such as credits, biomatter, and kelp. Lots of kelp.

Apparently when we colonise the seas, the only thing available to eat will be kelp. I’ve never tried kelp. Have you tried kelp? They tell me it's the kale of the sea, but I'm pretty sure that's a lie.


Review: Gùgōng

that gets my scrote, a greasy bribey baby, we don't eat pears here
Oof! When was the last time a game let you get jade, AND sail boat, AND great wall?

Gùgōng is the new game from venerable designer Andreas Steding, and we think it may well be worth your time. This game is a teasing web of tricky economies and corrupt cardplay, and we absolutely can't wait for the expansion to be revealed later this year.

Have a great weekend, everybody.


SU&SD Play… Gloomhaven!

matt will never be young again, quinns wants to go through a door, inoxes
This time last year, Matt published his review of the enormous, decadent game of Gloomhaven. But since (a) it remains a superb game, (b) Quinns hadn't played it, and (c) it was the only way Matt could make progress in his campaign, this week we decided to break it out on our Twitch channel.

Be sure to tune in on the 6th of December, when we'll be streaming Pretzel Games' excellent Men at Work. But then, that's only a short game, so perhaps you can also expect a surprise or two...


Review – Brass: Birmingham

boyFetch, a grimy sweet-shop, textbook textures
More than two years ago Quinns reviewed the classic game of Brass, but ultimately came away disappointed (and wet, and riding high on sugar).

Today, it's time for round 2! Introducing Brass: Birmingham, a collaboration between Roxley Games and original designer Martin Wallace, this is the sequel to Brass.

Will this industrial revolution bring progress, or once again grind our reviewers' gears? Click play, and find out.


Review: Root (and the Riverfolk Expansion!)

beaver arms dealers, unflagging felines, sinister muppet-pluckers, a raccoon ronin
A long time ago in a forest far, far away...

This week we're proud to present our review of Root, which is surely the board game industry's new beau. A grand, inventive game of cat and mouse, as well fox and bird, and - should you buy the Riverfolk expansion - beaver and lizard.

As Quinns says in the review, everybody involved in this production needs to take a bow. But should you buy it? Click play and find out...


Review: Lowlands

daddy lowlands, glassy-eyed virii, quintin speaks dutch?
This week Paul and Quinns are excited to examine Lowlands, a svelte and confident sheep farming game in the style of venerable designer Uwe Rosenberg, BUT WITH A TWIST. At the end of the game your herds might wash away in a dreadful storm.

Only one question remains. What wool they think of it?


Review: Container

five years, a bermuda triangle of good taste, quintin's new power strip
GOOD THINGS COME TO THOSE WHO WAIT! Container, the legendary contest of international shipping, has finally been reprinted. Inside this box are seven-inch resin container ships, it features a new module titled "The investment bank", and we've finally discovered that this game is an utter car crash.

What's that you say? None of those sound like "good things"!? Pah, our viewers are philistines.


Review: Arkwright

children up chimneys, the longest spoons, our efficiencies will blot out the sun
Who wants to play a game about manufacturing forks!

Anybody? No? What if we were to tell you that Arkwright turns the manufacturing of bread, forks and lamps into a bruising war. What if we were to say that this game puts the very machinery of the industrial revolution in your hands, and allows you to grind your friends in its very cogs.

What if we were to tell you that this game is a cheaper, rock-solid competitor to fascinating games like Food Chain Magnate and Panamax.

Would you want to play then?


Review: War of the Ring

king of the bobbits, gothic seagulls, shut up and war of the ring
If you were looking for one game to rule them all, War of the Ring might be it. This magical game has more than 200 plastic miniatures, 40 pages of rules and a depth that most board games could only dream of.

But what will Matt and Quinns make of it? For one thing, this wouldn't be the first time that Lord of the Rings was accused of being too long.

Click play, and let their opinions seep into your very bones.