FlowerFall

Flowers falling from the sky! In FlowerFall, players attempt to form large garden patches containing more of their color flower than their opponents. Each continuous patch will score points at the end of the game. Adding cards to the table is not as simple as placing them down, however. You must carefully drop them, letting them flutter through the air. Skill improves your chances, but the whim of the environment may thwart you.

FlowerFall is a quick, portable game you can play anywhere. The location you’re at becomes the terrain!

Read More

Impulse

Impulse is a quick-playing 4X (explore, expand, exploit, and exterminate) game set in space with the game board being composed of cards that have actions on them. Players also have cards in hand, and in addition to featuring one of ten possible actions, these cards have a color (red, yellow, blue or green) and a size (1, 2 or 3, as indicated by the number of icons on the card). Each card also has six edges, and these edges connect adjacent cards in the hex-shaped playing area.

The cards in the playing area start face down, with each player controlling a card(their Home) on a corner of this area. Each player has two transport ships in the center of his Home card and a cruiser on an edge. Cruisers are used to patrol sectors of space and destroy opposing transports, while transports let you activate sectors that you enter.

On a turn, a player adds a card to the Impulse from his hand, then (optionally) performs an action for a tech in his playing area, then (optionally) performs all the actions in the Impulse, then draws two cards and adds them to his hand. The Impulse is a line of cards shared by all players that changes turn by turn as players add cards to it and as cards fall off once it reaches maximum size. Thus, players need to feed the Impulse with actions that benefit them more than opponents, but that’s easier said than done.

When you perform actions – whether from moving transports to them or using the Impulse – you can boost them by having minerals of the same color or lots of transports. Each action has a single numeral on it, e.g., “Command [1] ship for one jump” or “Build [1] cruiser at home”; when you boost an action, you increase that numeral.

Players score points by destroying enemy ships (one point per ship), by controlling edge spaces on the central card (one point per edge), and by taking other actions via cards. The first player to score 20 points wins!

Read More

Glory to Rome

n 64 A.D., a great fire originating from the slums of Rome quickly spreads to destroy much of the city, including the imperial palace. Upon hearing news of the fire, Emperor Nero Caesar races back to Rome from his private estate in Antium and sets up shelters for the displaced population. Reporting directly to Nero, you are responsible for rebuilding the structures lost in the fire and restoring Glory to Rome.

Glory to Rome is a card-based city building and resource management game with a novel mechanism. Each card may act as a building, a client, a raw material, or a valuable resource, frequently forcing players into difficult decisions regarding how each card should be used. In addition, much of the game is played from the discard pool, giving players some control over what cards are accessible to opponents. Actions are triggered by a form of card-driven role selection — the active player leads a role, and other players may follow if they discard a matching card from hand (to the pool). Players who don’t follow may ‘think’ to draw more cards. There are thus strong interactions between the different uses of cards. Scoring is a combination of completing buildings and storing resources, with end-of-game bonuses for storing a diverse assortment. Game length is player-controlled, and is triggered in a few different ways.

The lighthearted artwork of the original editions was replaced by minimalist art in the ‘black box’ edition, and both have been the source of great controversy. Many of the non-English editions use more conventional artwork.

Read More

Mottainai

“Mottainai” (pronounced mot/tai/nai or like the English words mote-tie-nigh) means “Don’t waste”, or “Every little thing has a soul”. In the game Mottainai, a successor in the Glory to Rome line, you use your cards for many purposes. Each player is an acolyte in a temple who performs tasks, collects materials, and sells or completes works for visitors. Every card can be each of these three things.

You choose tasks to allow you to perform actions, keeping in mind that other players will get to follow up on your task on their next turn. Clever planning and combining of your works’ special abilities is key, as is managing which materials you sell.

Mottainai is a quick, but deep, game experience.

Read More

Red7

The rules of “Red” are simple: highest card wins! But “Red” is just one of seven games you’ll be playing in Red7, and if you’re not winning the current game at the end of your turn, you’re out! The last person standing wins the round.

The deck in Red7 is 49 cards: each of the colors of the rainbow numbered 1 to 7. A hand takes just a couple minutes!

Read More

Innovation

Review: Innovation

This game by Carl Chudyk is a journey through innovations from the stone age through modern times. Each player builds a civilization based on various technologies, ideas, and cultural advancements, all represented by cards. Each of these cards has a unique power which will allow further advancement, point scoring, or even attacking other civilizations. Be careful though, as other civilizations may be able to benefit from your ideas as well!

To win, you must score achievements, which you can attain by amassing points or by meeting certain criteria with the innovations you have built. Plan your civilization well, and outmaneuver your opponents, and with some luck you will achieve victory!

Read More

Yokai

There’s confusion among the Yōkai! These Japanese spirits have become intermingled in Yōkai, and to calm them, you have to group together members of the same family. They’re hiding, however, so to carry out your task successfully, you have to be clever and not make any noise to avoid frightening them…

Read More

Yomi

Yomi (second edition) updates the original Yomi game with slight rule modifications and balance tweaks, in addition to adding ten new characters.

Yomi is a fighting game in card form in which physical dexterity is replaced by hand management skills. Just like in a fighting game, you have to know your character, know the matchup, and know your opponent. Each character has a deck that follows the same conventions as deck of playing cards. This makes it easy to learn the contents of your deck: numbered cards are normal moves, face cards are special moves, and aces are super moves.

Read More

Detective Club

Detective Club is a board game for players who enjoy party, with simple rules that take just a minute to explain. Intrigue, sudden revelations, limitless creativity, and tons of fun await you in this game! Lead the investigation as a detective, or cover your tracks as the infiltrated conspirator. Discuss, accuse, object and try to convince everyone.

In Detective Club, on each round, one of the players secretly teams up with another — the Conspirator — and tries to make them guess a secret word using just two illustrated cards! Other players are detectives, who also know the word, but don’t know the identities of each other. Detectives have to find out who the conspirator is, making sure they don’t get accused by their fellow players!

Read More

Combo Fighter

Combo Fighter – Tag Team by Kolossal Games Price: – EUR 39,95 – – Called to an exclusive competition on an offshore oil rig by an eccentric billionaire, the world’s best brawlers, and martial artists will compete for lavish prizes and the glory of proving that they are the strongest and most skilled. In Combo Fighter you … Read more

Read More

Shutupshow Tweets

Purple pillars, emotional conflict, and a worm called desire: This week's video sees Matt dive into Cerebria: The Inside World. youtu.be/DRU9vS-pU_8

About 6 days ago from Shut Up & Sit Down's Twitter via TweetDeck